I can’t believe it’s still snowing

I missed posting last week, and for that I apologize to anyone that actually reads this. Last week seemed to get away from me, and I’m not sure how because looking back, last week wasn’t that busy.

This week is very blah. I’m not depressed (I don’t think), but I just don’t feel my best. I get spurts of motivation, and then spurts of blobbing on the couch watching Chicago Med (as I’m doing right now). I’ve gotten stuff done today, got up at a good time, good a good night’s sleep. But…..blah.

It doesn’t help that the weather sucks. And I totally have to go out and shovel the driveway in a little bit.

I’ll update more later this week, hopefully when I have a better handle on what’s going on.

That’s not real…is it?

So… I was doing a little research this week on a problem I seem to have (that my therapist claims everyone has, I just have it a little more often than “normal” people). He calls them intrusive thoughts. I call them scary as hell.

These are the thoughts that come along seemingly randomly. Things like, while you’re driving, “I wonder what would happen if I wrecked my car into that pole.” Or (among my personal favorites) while holding something sharp, “I wonder what it would feel like if I stabbed myself in the stomach.” Another good one is while standing at the sink getting ready, “Mike could easily come up behind me with the shotgun.” Not that he’d ever do that. But there it is.

Yeah. Not fun. Fucked up. Creepy. And totally jarring.

I do have ones that aren’t quite as violent. The thought that I’m going to get fired is a common one. They’re still unsettling even if they aren’t as violent.

My therapist claims that everyone to some degree or another has these thoughts, but the regularity and severity of mine are definitely a symptom of my anxiety. It’s unsettling to have these thoughts, even if I don’t act on them. And I know they’re not based in reality.

It’s interesting, while I was doing some research for this post last week, really the only mentions I could find of these types of thoughts were women who postpartum. They talked about having thoughts that you couldn’t take care of your baby, or that something bad was going to happen to you or your baby, etc. But none of these websites dealt fully with the fucked-up-ness that these everyday thoughts bring with them.

Anyway, my therapist (his name is Sean, I don’t feel like typing out ‘my therapist’ every time I mention him) and I came up with a plan. I would develop some kind of mental totem, if you will, to remind myself that these thoughts are irrational. This works most of the time, mainly because my totem is so absurd. It started out as Leonard Nemoy wearing a crossing guard vest, holding a stop sign, saying “this is illogical.” Then I watched a whole lot of Futurama and it became that Leonard Nemoy. I think it works so well for me because it is absolutely ridiculous. But it’s a visual I’ve trained myself to create quickly, and it makes me stop and really address that the thought isn’t logical or true, and I can dismiss it.

It can be hard to realize that these thoughts aren’t real, or aren’t something you would do. But they AREN’T real, they AREN’T true, and you AREN’t crazy for having them.

Sleep; that elusive mistress….. or not

The worst part of my job is switching shifts month to month. One month, 7p-7a. One month 7a-7p. After five years of this, my body does not know when it’s supposed to sleep. Especially around switch time. And on my days off, apparently no matter what shift, I sleep for 12 hours (at least; sometimes it’s closer to 14) a night. And I admit it, sometimes the cats coerce me into a nap.

This schedule shouldn’t work for me – everyone knows that when dealing with bipolar, keeping to a schedule is the best thing you can do. I have no normal schedule. I end up only sleeping 6-7 hours a night (or day) on days (or nights) that I work, so my body tries to play catch-up on my days off. I get out of bed at all hours of the day, and it really doesn’t seem to matter if I set an alarm. It’s like my brain knows that I don’t have to be at work so it does its damnedest to ignore the alarms. And it normally does.

I’m hoping that if I find a new job a sense of stability will come with it – I can go to bed at the same time every night, get up at the same time every day, maybe sleep in a little on weekends. Have a normal schedule like a normal person. Wouldn’t that be the day?